China treasures sold at Cherrystone

0439539e-3608-4f0c-9c5c-bc65cdcb69da

Latest Posts
Stamp Guide
Alderney postboxes
14 February 2024
Stamp Guide
Marine Mosacis from Isle of Man
31 January 2024
Stamp Guide
'Typically Dutch' cows on new stamps
24 January 2024
Stamp Guide
150th anniversary of the GSPCA
24 January 2024
Stamp Guide
Norfolk Island's Humpback whale
22 January 2024
Stamp Guide
Hong Kong postal HQ on stamps
17 January 2024
19 June 2023
|
The sale of the Carl Kilgas Collection of China at Cherrystone Philatelic Auctions saw many philatelic treasures go under the hammer, including a sheet of 25 1878 5-can orange stamps that fetched an impressive $100,000.

A sheet of 25 1878 5-can orange stamps of China was one of the highlights of the important sale of Chinese material.

Featuring hinge remnants at top and bottom margins only, both of which are slightly reduced (trimmed at top and bottom), and faint toning 'well away from the stamps', the complete sheet was said to be 'post office fresh'. SOLD FOR £78,175


'Large Dragon' covers also sold well at the auction, commanding high prices. Included was an 1880 cover franked on the back with a 3-can brown red and 5-can orange, both cancelled and tied by an oval seal, with 'Customs Tientsin March 15, 80' departure postmark.

Sent via 'Customs Shanghai Mar 20, 80', and through the French Shanghai Post Office, the front of the cover featured an unoverprinted 35c Type Sage cancelled by '5104' large numerals. 

The cover was addressed to Frau Detring, wife of Gustav Detring, Tientsin Commissioner of Customs in charge of all China's postal operations, in Wiesbaden, Germany.

The auction catalogue noted: 'unusually nice cover showing the scarce 8 Candareen rate from Tientsin, via Shanghai and the French Post Office to Germany.' SOLD FOR £39,000

Content continues after advertisements


A set of four 1911 1/2c, 4c, 5c and 20c brown, the first one without gum, were also on offer, fetching $65,000.

The lot description explained: 'Early in 1911, six values in the new colour reached Shanghai. They were placed in storage waiting for the blue stock to run out. The 1c and 2c were released on February 22nd. After the Republican Revolution, all Imperial stamps were to be overprinted for the New Republic, including all blue and brown Postage Dues. In later years, a few unoverprinted "brown dues" appeared; 5c was actually listed in the 1929 Scott catalogue. In 1946, when President Roosevelt's collection was auctioned off, the four unused values offered here, were discovered in the "Stamp Gift Album" given to FDR by Chiang Kai-shek in 1941. Complete sets of the four values are virtually impossible to find.' SOLD FOR £50,815